Pest Madness

By:

Eddie Connor

March 3, 2016

What a wonderful time of the year. Birds are chirping. Trees are blooming. And people—well, they’re inside watching basketball. March Madness is upon us. And with this great tournament comes great school nicknames.

We’ll be introduced to the Red Raiders of Texas Tech, the Blue Raiders of Middle Tennessee State, the Stephen F. Austin Lumberjacks, the Hawaii Rainbow Warriors, two sets of Trojans, countless Bulldogs and Wildcats, and of course, the Stony Brook Seawolves.Each year, we speculate how the Connor’s team would perform in the tournament. Would the Connor’s University Pest Experts be able to knock out the Iowa State Cyclones or the Miami Hurricanes? Probably not. But we might fare pretty well against some of the pest and wildlife teams. Check out our projections below.

Maryland Terrapins

Many of our clients work and live in Maryland, so we’ll tread lightly when discussing the UMD mascot. A terrapin—for the uninformed—is one of several small turtle species that lives in or near fresh or brackish water. Whereas turtles are almost exclusively aquatic and tortoises are almost exclusively land dwellers, terrapins spend their time divided between water and land.

Though turtles, tortoises, and terrapins differ in their living habits, they rarely pester humans. In fact, they often offer beneficial and economic benefits, especially in aquatic habitats. In fish farms, for instance, turtles help cull the diseased and weakened fish, and can clean up dead or decaying animal matter. On land, tortoises and terrapins can sometimes damage plants and gardens, but they are rarely a threat. If it becomes necessary to remove these slow-moving creatures from your property, several live traps are available. We recommend relocating them at least 10 miles away.

Wisconsin Badgers

The American Badger is found very, very infrequently in our area. But if one did pop up in the DMV region, Connor’s would know how to handle it. Badgers are carnivorous mammals similar to weasels, otters, and ferrets. They are nocturnal and feed on an assortment of small prey, including moles, ground squirrels, snakes, and ground-nesting birds. Though they aren’t pests in the same sense that an animal like a mosquito or a mouse is, badgers can still disrupt yards and gardens by digging while in search of prey.

A variety of exclusion techniques are effective when it comes to badger control. Burying mesh fencing or using bright lights at night will discourage badgers from approaching your property. Similarly, controlling the rodent population on your property will remove the food source for badgers, and they’ll likely go somewhere else in search of dinner. Live traps are also effective, but badgers do often return to their old diggings.

Oregon Ducks

Though ducks don’t usually provoke fear, the University of Oregon’s basketball team has put fear into their opponents’ eyes all season long. They are a top seed in this year’s tournament, but we think the Connor’s team could still take them.

Ducks are only considered pests when they are overtaking bodies of water or settling on your lawn. The main problem that people have with ducks is that they are extremely messy. Bird netting is an effective way to keep ducks from a certain area, but it usually isn’t feasible for large areas. Visual deterrents like replica predators can also scare ducks away.

Help Defense

Whether you’re battling a nasty batch of yellow jackets (better luck next year Georgia Tech) or your property is overrun with Spiders (ditto to the University of Richmond), Connor’s is there to provide some help defense. Our pest and wildlife experts use a holistic, eco-friendly approach to pest management, making sure that you, and your home, are well taken care of. Give us a call today to learn more. And good luck with your brackets!

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