The Forecast is Calling for Bugs, Bugs, and More Bugs!

By:

Eddie Connor

With unusual weather this winter and spring across most of the U.S., people everywhere can expect a few more pest problems than normal. It’s worth noting that both warm, wet winters and cooler springs can exacerbate pest problems.

According to Jim Fredericks, Ph.D., chief entomologist and vice president of technical and regulatory affairs for the NPMA (National Pest Management Association), ticks, mosquitoes, ants, and other pests will be more plentiful this spring and summer. He told PestWorld.org that people should be especially vigilant about pest prevention, as pests can spread Zika, Lyme Disease, and more.

Beware of Ticks after a Dry, Warm Winter.

Higher tick populations can be found in the Northeast after a warmer and drier winter. Ticks are small arachnids that drink the blood of their host as their source of food. They are most commonly known for spreading Lyme disease and can cause harm to both humans and animals.

Be sure to check yourself and others after a day outside, especially if you have been traveling through grassy or wooded areas. Also, try to bathe or shower as soon as possible after coming indoors to wash off, and inspect your body for any ticks that may be crawling on you. Don’t forget to check your gear and clothing for ticks that may have latched on during your time outdoors.

April Showers May Bring More Than May Flowers.

Mosquitos proliferate when spring rains form the puddles where these bugs multiply. Mosquitos are transmitters of many diseases, including malaria, and leave itchy bumps wherever they bite. Prevent mosquito bites by wearing loose, long sleeve shirts and long pants when heading outdoors. 

To prevent both tick and mosquito bites, use a repellent that contains 20% to 30% DEET on any exposed skin and clothing for protection.

Earwigs Might Try to Nest if Spring is Cool.

When spring temperatures dip lower than normal, pests like earwigs may try to escape the chill by taking up residence in your house. Despite popular beliefs, earwigs do not burrow into the ears of people while they sleep and they do not spread disease. However, they are still not something you want to be cozying up to at night.

Earwigs can infest many different areas in a home, so it may be necessary to use several insecticide products to control them effectively. At Connor’s, we have the products and equipment to control earwigs effectively.

Make sure you are aware of pests around you and taking necessary preventive measures to avoid one of these potentially dangerous pests ­– and the diseases they may spread – this season.